Facebook Exposes Millions of Passwords in Clear Text

Facebook has been under the spot light for quite some time now for its poor security and privacy practices. With this latest privacy blunder, its obvious that the company has not learned from its past. Last week it was uncovered that the company is storing passwords in clear text. This not only affects Facebook users, but InstaGram users too. It was not revealed as to why these passwords were stored in clear text, however what is known is that it affects millions of the company’s users.

In a Facebook blog post by Pedro Canahuati, VP Engineering, Security and Privacy mentioned that the company uncovered the error in January during a routine security review. Canahuati also stated that these clear text passwords were only viewed by those who worked for the company.

At least LinkedIn has your back… Oh nevermind.

Let’s not forget the many security breaches which affected passwords in the past. LinkedIn in 2012 had millions of passwords stolen from the company by hackers. In the breach, the passwords had been hashed, but with a low grade hashing algorithm. At least in LinkedIn’s case we can say the passwords were somewhat protected. In Facebook’s instance, they did not even bother to encrypt the passwords. If the passwords were ever stolen we would see another Yahoo! breach in the making.

Protecting Yourself Online

Canahuati did not mention in his post how to remedy the issue other than to say that the passwords are hashed and salted when an account is created. I would still suggest that everyone change their passwords anyway along with activating multifactor authentication for their account. This way even if someone were to have the password, they would not have the secret token generated by a smart app or hardware token like YubiKey. This also includes those who have InstaGram accounts as well since they were also affected.

One cannot trust the privacy and security that a service provider offers. We must take it upon ourselves to better protect our online identities from mishaps of the services we use. By using password managers to ensure we do not reuse the same password between services to ensuring multifactor authentication is used on every service that offers it is the only way to protect ourselves.

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